Reblogged from Mycroft Holmes esquire

I asked myself what style we women could have adopted that would have been unmarked, like the men’s. The answer was none. There is no unmarked woman.

There is no woman’s hair style that can be called standard, that says nothing about her. The range of women’s hair styles is staggering, but a woman whose hair has no particular style is perceived as not caring about how she looks, which can disqualify her for many positions, and will subtly diminish her as a person in the eyes of some.

Women must choose between attractive shoes and comfortable shoes. When our group made an unexpected trek, the woman who wore flat, laced shoes arrived first. Last to arrive was the woman in spike heels, shoes in hand and a handful of men around her.

If a woman’s clothing is tight or revealing (in other words, sexy), it sends a message — an intended one of wanting to be attractive, but also a possibly unintended one of availability. If her clothes are not sexy, that too sends a message, lent meaning by the knowledge that they could have been. There are thousands of cosmetic products from which women can choose and myriad ways of applying them. Yet no makeup at all is anything but unmarked. Some men see it as a hostile refusal to please them.

Women can’t even fill out a form without telling stories about themselves. Most forms give four titles to choose from. “Mr.” carries no meaning other than that the respondent is male. But a woman who checks “Mrs.” or “Miss” communicates not only whether she has been married but also whether she has conservative tastes in forms of address — and probably other conservative values as well. Checking “Ms.” declines to let on about marriage (checking “Mr.” declines nothing since nothing was asked), but it also marks her as either liberated or rebellious, depending on the observer’s attitudes and assumptions.

I sometimes try to duck these variously marked choices by giving my title as “Dr.” — and in so doing risk marking myself as either uppity (hence sarcastic responses like “Excuse me!”) or an overachiever (hence reactions of congratulatory surprise like “Good for you!”).

All married women’s surnames are marked. If a woman takes her husband’s name, she announces to the world that she is married and has traditional values. To some it will indicate that she is less herself, more identified by her husband’s identity. If she does not take her husband’s name, this too is marked, seen as worthy of comment: she has done something; she has “kept her own name.” A man is never said to have “kept his own name” because it never occurs to anyone that he might have given it up. For him using his own name is unmarked.

A married woman who wants to have her cake and eat it too may use her surname plus his, with or without a hyphen. But this too announces her marital status and often results in a tongue-tying string. In a list (Harvey O’Donovan, Jonathan Feldman, Stephanie Woodbury McGillicutty), the woman’s multiple name stands out. It is marked.

Reblogged from Seanan's Tumblr

sweetcatastrophex:

THIS IS IMPORTANT

Reblogged from Seanan's Tumblr
I’ve realised that some of you would of seen me come out with the microphone, may have become concerned…

well played, sir

Reblogged from Mycroft Holmes esquire
kateordie:

moonglade-poetess:

tastefullyoffensive:

Bop it, Twist it, Pull it, Spin it, Flick it.


fixed it.

kateordie:

moonglade-poetess:

tastefullyoffensive:

Bop it, Twist it, Pull it, Spin it, Flick it.

fixed it.

image

Reblogged from Love & a Sandwich

Now I want to be Sexy Barad-Dur for Hallowe’en… 

Reblogged from modHero

shyghost:

the world already caters to you and values you. you can handle one website discussing things without you.

Reblogged from Seanan's Tumblr

thedoubleclicks:

fuckyeahfemaleyoutubers:

Earlier today Laura Chernikoff made this tweet

Which prompted this conversation

And that got me interested in working out what the demographics have been for the Special Guests (as listed on their websites) of the past four major YouTube events. I feel like we’re all generally aware that women and people of color are underrepresented at these things, but when you look at the numbers it becomes embarrassingly clear how ridiculous this disparity is.

The highest percentage of female Special Guests at any of these events was 32% at Summer in the City. LESS THAN 1/3. 

The highest percentage of Special Guests of color* at any of these events is 16% at the current Buffer Festival. LESS THAN 1/6. (And SitC only had ONE PoC on their Special Guest list this year, which is fucking absurd.)

I don’t want to rant about this too much, I just sort of want to make these numbers known because I find them maddening. And if you guys do too, I encourage you to message the organizers of these events, let them know your thoughts, and maybe recommend them some of the incredible prominent women and PoC we have in this community. 

  • Playlist Live: http://www.playlist-live.com/contact/
  • VidCon: info@vidcon.com
  • Summer in the City: support@sitc-event.co.uk
  • Buffer Festival: support@bufferfestival.com (Corey contacted me not too long ago about female representation at Buffer and I gave him a ton of names, but I don’t know if he had time to take any of those suggestions on board in time for the event. Hopefully it’s something he and the team are genuinely serious about and that next year will be better on that).

C’mon YouTube events. I love you, but you seriously need to get your shit together.

*Note that my count is based primarily on looks and the people whose races I know for sure. If I made a mistake and missed anyone who’s white passing, let me know.

Representation is important. 

Studies have shown that the probability of having a woman speaker at a conference is correlated to the fraction of conference organizers that are women.” (source)

It seems likely that is true for PoC as well. 

And remember…. 

This is not equal representation:

image

This is equal representation:

image

SAY IT AGAIN ONE MOE TIME

(source)

Reblogged from The Doubleclicks

tamorapierce:

caninevillain:

i remember i took latin in high school and the first latin textbook had stories about the same family and characters and it talked about their lives and stuff so youd get attached to them and then in the final story mount vesuvius erupted and they all fucking died

And people complain about things I do in my books!  At least I don’t kill off the whole cast!

hard core text book

Reblogged from I Like the Sparklies